the journey to paid professional performing artist

http://www.musicaltheatreaudition.com/performance/auditions/afteraudition.html

 I came across this just after I wrote a thank you note for my American Music Theatre audition.  I knew to do this from my education in business school, but was never 100% sure about the practice when it comes to theater.  I’m glad to see that it is recommended.

Unlike the business world, this should be a hand-written note.  I like to include a business card as well, so they don’t have to go searching for who you are.  More on business cards later…

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What To Do After Your Audition

For some of us, the audition itself can seem easy compared to that awful task of waiting to hear back afterwards. I still remember the butterflies in my stomach when, as an elementary school student, I went to check the list of our own little plays. Unfortunately, this act of “wait and see” is one of those things that doesn’t seem to get much easier with age.

  1. Send a thank you note. A brief follow-up reminds them of who you are and your interest in working with them.
  2. Record your reflections, the date the thank you note was sent, and any other important info in your audition log book.
  3. Now, forget about it. If you expect to hear back, you will almost certainly be disappointed or at the very least drive yourself crazy while you wait.

One of the most important things to remember is that auditions are never just about that particular job. They are also about getting your name out there, meeting lots of people and getting a “leg up” on future work. Show continued interest and perserverence:

  1. Go and see a production by the company you auditioned for. Speak to them afterwards (briefly) if it seems appropriate to do so.
  2. Don’t be afraid to audition for the same people again, unless they specify not to audition again if they have already seen you.
  3. Volunteer for box office, ushering, assistant to whoever.
  4. Network. Go to social events and fundraisers and talk to people.

Most importantly: never burn a bridge!

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